As the number of those infected with the COVID-19, businesses shuttering and furloughs continue to mount, it is only natural that we seek out some positive stories to counterbalance growing anxiety.

The good news is we are rising to the occasion, being kind and helpful to one another, all over the country, even as we deal with stay-at-home orders, supply shortages and layoffs in the shadow of COVID-19.

Here are some positive stories about Canadians lifting one another up during the pandemic to brighten your day.

In the Yukon, bhangra dancer Gurdeep Pandher and bagpiper Jordan Lincenz celebrate Canada’s multicultural heritage while social distancing as Lincenz provides musical accompaniment to Pandher’s performance.

In Montreal, hockey players Jeff Petry and P.K. Subban are support healthcare workers by providing free meals as a thank you to those on the front line in the fight against COVID-19.

In Vancouver, the city shows its appreciation by having a 7 p.m. celebration of healthcare workers, with residents taking to their windows, balconies and porches and cheering and otherwise making noise.

In Ottawa, “window walks” are being organized as a social distance friendly distraction for kids and families. As part of the experience, kids produce their own artwork and hang it in a window visible from the sidewalk. They then walk their neighborhoods and try to spot others’ work. Additionally, communities are utilizing social media to organize nightly sing-alongs and encourage one another to put up Christmas lights to brighten up their neighborhoods.

In Mississauga, a 70-year-old patriarch expected his birthday, ordinary a celebration that included his extended family, to be low key during the COVID-19 quarantine. Instead, he was greeted with a display of photos and personalized birthday wishes organized by his family and wife.

In Quebec, the phrase “ça va bien aller,” or “it’s going to be OK,” is on everyone’s lips – and on their windows, as neighborhoods decorate their homes with rainbows and the phrase. It’s taken off in Quebecois social media as a hashtag as well.

In Toronto, local performance group Choir!Choir!Choir! is hosting regular virtual sing-alongs, dubbed Social Distan-Sing-Alongs, leading Canadians in choruses of old and new favorites on Facebook Live, in a community building effort.

“Caremongering” social media groups have popped up, with Canadians asking for and offering help and sharing pertinent information. The groups were founded by Toronto residents to encourage community and camaraderie during the COVID-19 epidemic and combat panic.